A successful affiliate marketing program requires oversight — transferring and keeping up the creative inventory, supporting and speaking with affiliates, and reporting and investigation. The person doing this oversight is additionally likely responsible for developing limited time strategies, negotiating placements on affiliate sites, recruiting new affiliates, and ensuring all best affiliate products are engaged and active.

These responsibilities are regularly associated with an in-house affiliate marketing manager or an outsourced program manager.

In-house Affiliate Managers

In-house affiliate managers are regularly paid a pay, in addition to benefits and bonuses. As indicated by a paid survey released by the Performance Marketing Association this past April, very nearly 60 percent of respondents said that the compensation of an affiliate marketing manager was between $50,000 to $80,000, while that of a senior affiliate marketing manager was between $80,000 to $100,000.

Of the companies surveyed, 31 percent reported yearly revenue of more than $10 million, and 38 percent reported yearly revenue between $1 million to $10 million.

The benefit of contracting an in-house affiliate manager is that the person is focused entirely on your program. Additionally, since she is nearby and integrated with the rest of your marketing team, she can react rapidly to shifts in a limited time strategy and more easily collaborate with other team members to help internal initiatives.

Outsourced Affiliate Management

The other alternative is to outsource the management of your affiliate marketing project to an agency. This isn’t an exceptional practice. You would normally be assigned to an affiliate manager at the agency. Instead of paying compensation, you’re normally paying a month to month retainer and a percentage of sales.

One of the benefits of working with an external agency is that numerous agencies have access to lower rates for the affiliate network, placement opportunities, and affiliate devices that could offset some of the months to month cost. Another benefit is that an agency could have a wide view of affiliate performance and have more understanding of what placements work best with what retailer, because the agency may have tested that placement with another client.

A disadvantage of working with an agency is that a record manager there likely works with numerous clients. A retailer ought to ask the agency what the most extreme number of clients a record manager is allowed to deal with and what other clients the agency manages, as this will indicate the agency’s strengths.

For example, some agencies are solid with driving leads, others center around the travel segment, while others have expertise in marketing to women.

Retainers for agencies are ordinarily between $1,000 and $5,000 per month. Variables that sway this range could include the term (a one-year contract versus multi-year), percentage of revenue share, and scope of service.

Depending on the size of the record, some agencies will allow a team to work with the client, with team members having specialized capacities, for example, recruiting or reporting.

Another factor that could affect the agency’s fee structure is the development of the client’s affiliate program. A new program often requires a lot of introductory work before typical management services kick in.

A new program requires testing, creative inventory, and beginning outreach and recruiting activities. Therefore, for new projects, it’s normal to see higher retainers and a lower revenue share. This arrangement could evolve as the record develops.

When picking between an in-house manager or an external agency, don’t base the decision on cost alone. Running an affiliate program takes effort.

Be honest about the level of internal resources in your organization that can be dedicated to the channel. It is certainly possible to prepare someone who is interested and driven. In any case, an affiliate program without dedicated effort won’t succeed. You may even consider contacting an agency or specialist to prepare an existing employee.

The key point to remember is that affiliates are just as engaged as the program manager. So whichever choice you choose, the key is to have someone who is dedicated to developing your program.

A successful affiliate marketing program requires oversight — transferring and keeping up the creative inventory, endorsing and speaking with affiliates, and reporting and investigation. The person doing this oversight is additionally likely responsible for developing special strategies, negotiating placements on affiliate sites, recruiting new affiliates, and ensuring all affiliates are engaged and active.

These responsibilities are commonly associated with an in-house affiliate marketing manager or an outsourced program manager.

In-house Affiliate Managers

In-house affiliate managers are commonly paid compensation, in addition to benefits and bonuses. As per a paid survey released by the Performance Marketing Association this past April, just about 60 percent of respondents said that the compensation of an affiliate marketing manager was between $50,000 to $80,000, while that of a senior affiliate marketing manager was between $80,000 to $100,000.

Of the companies surveyed, 31 percent reported yearly revenue of more than $10 million, and 38 percent reported yearly revenue between $1 million to $10 million.

The benefit of enlisting an in-house affiliate manager is that the person is focused entirely on your program. Likewise, since she is nearby and integrated with the rest of your marketing team, she can react rapidly to shifts in special strategy and more easily collaborate with other team members to help internal initiatives.